Can't seem to wrap my head around Objective-C


#1

Ok, I’ve gone over the first 2 chapters of the book and I feel like such a failure. :frowning: I understand the first chapter, but once I hit the second chapter on the Objective-C language itself, things start to go downhill. Everybody else seems to have success other than me. I don’t know if it’s me but it could be the syntax itself or the immense amount of logic involved.

I’ve got a huge passion to create an iPhone app for the summer, but with this big obstacle, it seems that I won’t reach that goal by the end of the summer. I already have Kochan’s Progamming in Objective-C 2.0 book, but once I hit the 3rd or 4th chapter, I couldn’t understand anything. What can I do???


#2

I don’t know if this helps but I think of Objective C as Structures with Functions.

So you are creating Objects that have function. Therefor you need to define the Structure and then create the structure to
use it. This may be basic or very wrong but it helped me wrap my brain around the idea.

like I said hope this helps.
Ian


#3

Thatartist,
It definitely sounds like you need more basic programming training. Without a solid foundation in programming 101, learning object oriented programming is much harder, and then objective c is even harder, and then iphone programming (with delegates and everything else involved) is even harder than that. I would seek out a Programming C 101 style book or Beginning Programming in C book, and get through that book first. And of course, BNR are putting out a programming book soon too!

Good luck!


#4

I would highly recommend reading Aaron Hillegass’s book Objective-C Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide. I am completely new to programming, an absolute beginner. It took me about 30 hours to work through Obj-C Programming working through all the code examples, doing all of the challenges, taking notes, and creating flashcards (in Anki), so it is not a huge time commitment and well worth the effort. I’m now 5 chapters into iOS Programming and not having any trouble with the Obj-C.

So start out by working through Obj-C Programming and then jump back into this book.

For a little more background, prior to Hillegass’s book, I read Chris Pine’s Learn to Program (which uses Ruby to teach the absolute basics of programming and is also excellent) and 50% of Head First Java, which I’m still working through. These three books are written for someone new to programming and new to the respective language. I think I may have missed a concept or two in Hillegass if I hadn’t already encountered them in Pine and HFJ as some of their explanations are a little more thorough. But Hillegass’s book is a fantastic introduction for someone new to programming and new to Obj-C. I’m thrilled that I stumbled across it and can’t recommend it more highly.