Frustrating challenges


#1

i am finding these challenges very frustrating. I feel like I am (more or less) following along with the text of each chapter, but then the challenges seem to throw curveballs and introduce topics that have not been covered…

In other words, the challenges don’t feel like they are reinforcing the text, rather they are teaching concepts that should be in their own chapter.

I guess that’s the meaning of the word challenge…


#2

I am definitely experiencing the same.


#3

I totally disagree. I find that the challenges (as of Chapter 14, at least) sometimes state things slightly differently than the previous text does, but if you can work through the examples before the challenges you shouldn’t have trouble.

If you’re only reading the text and not creating the non-challenge projects I can see how the challenges would be more difficult.

I must admit I was quite mystified, though, by the + and - signs at the end of Ch. 14; I ignored that syntax and used the same techniques as in the NSDate examples and challenge.


#4

[quote=“wscjr1”]I totally disagree. I find that the challenges (as of Chapter 14, at least) sometimes state things slightly differently than the previous text does, but if you can work through the examples before the challenges you shouldn’t have trouble.

If you’re only reading the text and not creating the non-challenge projects I can see how the challenges would be more difficult.

I must admit I was quite mystified, though, by the + and - signs at the end of Ch. 14; I ignored that syntax and used the same techniques as in the NSDate examples and challenge.[/quote]

how can you totally disagree then follow that up with “i was mystified by the + and - signs”? Sounds like at most you partially disagree.

Furthermore, ignoring the + and - … though why would you assume to do that? …

where was the syntax (NSString *)localizedName covered?

In the Chapter 11 section on heap we see it first with Person *x = (Person *)malloc(sizeof(Person)); but nowhere does it detail what it means. I have no idea.

I won’t make a sweeping generalization about all challenges, but the challenges at the point the book starts covering memory and then Objective-C have been tangents to the material presented. You can use pattern recognition to solve them, but i don’t really grasp why they’re solved in the way they are.

For example the first time the text covers pointers, it states that functions can only return 1 value. But it doesn’t say why you need to return any. In fact, the function that is in use is a VOID function which returns nothing. So why use pointers when you could use global variables to solve the same problem?

I think the idea here is that a challenge should build on things that were presented previously, not “oh hey by the way here’s this new thing, use it to solve the challenge.”

While I believe the others to be yellow cards at best, the ch 14 challenge was a redcard in my opinion, to understand it i had to look up the concepts elsewhere which was a pain since it’s rather hard to look up + and - on google…


#5

also

[code]- (void)loadInfoFile;
versus

  • (void)loadInfoFile;
    The first is a regular method and the second is a class method.
    In plain English, you do not need to instantiate an object of the second one in order to call it[/code]

#6

Sorry to hear folks struggling. The book does in fact introduce the concept of casting…see page 45 or look up ‘cast operator’ if you have a different book version than mine. It was an easy thing for me to miss and I only realized it was there (or perhaps realized its importance) when I read the book for a second time.

Hope this helps.

PS. Don’t let frustration get in the way of learning…you are not alone. I’m grateful for communities like this one…so we can all learn from each other. I’ve found that even when I get the challenges right, reading some of the struggles and replies others have posted helps solidify my own understanding.